mayhap: Renaissance wise man with text I've had a crush on that king since I was sixteen (I've had a crush on that King)
So apparently this is a thing that is happening. I have to say, I already like it better than Bridget Jones: Mad About the Boy by virtue of not doing the spoilery thing ).
mayhap: a cartoon mouse adjusts his deerstalker cap (Basil of Baker Street)
What I've been reading

I read A Slight Trick of the Mind, which is the novel that the Sir Ian McKellen film Mr Holmes was adapted from. I really enjoyed the movie, mostly because of the performance at the center of it, although I also liked the complicated puzzle-box structure of the narrative even when some of the actual story choices made me go, really? Eh, whatever.

The book is mostly the same as the movie, except for where it's different, and I have to say, pretty much every change was a big improvement. It could be something I didn't necessarily care for in the movie, even, but the version in the book was definitely worse.

Book and film spoilers, also ranting )

I read A Red-Rose Chain, the new October Daye book. It was a fun enough read, but I feel like the series is moving in the direction of Toby fixing all things about the fairy world that make it inhumane, and…not sure if want.

I read Joseph Cornell: Master of Dreams, which is a good overview of Cornell's life and work with a decent number of illustrations. The author first met him in 1963 when she was writing her master's thesis on his work and then went on to work at the Guggenheim for thirty years, so she has an interesting perspective.

I read Hotel Andromeda, a novel that came up when I was doing a subject search for Cornell. The protagonist is trying to get started with writing a book about Cornell, and I enjoyed the snatches of her book within the book. The main action of the book is pretty much inert, though, with a lot of flat, repetitious dialogue and no ending to speak of, so on the whole I find it hard to recommend. It is very short, though, so you can easily skim all the bits I didn't care for if you wanted to!

I read Disclaimer and regretted it, because it has a hook-y premise (what if you picked up a novel with the standard legal disclaimer and yet it was all about you and a horrible secret that you didn't think anyone else knew?) and just did not deliver in a believable way. This spoilery review on Goodreads covers pretty much everything that annoyed me so I don't have to, but it is essentially composed entirely of Fridge Logic. Nothing at any point makes any sense when you go back and examine it in light of the big reveals.
mayhap: Spock's pouty face (I find this illogical)
I saw Star Trek this weekend with my dad and let me tell you, I have been dodging spoilers for this movie so long now that it feels wrong just reading those words without my eyes skittering off of them into a safe corner where the spoilers can't get me.

Star Trek: Into Spoilers )
mayhap: Orlando Bloom clutching a hardcover Lord of the Rings (canon)
I have finally seen The Hobbit Episode I The Phantom Dragon, so I am feeling more like a fully-topped-up member of this fandom. (I still have not finished my The Hobbit reread, however. Shhh, don't tell anyone.)

I quite liked it! On one hand, it doesn't stand on its own very well and I wouldn't even recommend it to introduce someone to the LOTR movieverse, much less to Tolkien fandom generally. On the other hand, if I had that kind of budget to produce a fanwork and I knew it was going to be my last opportunity to do so, I would indulge all of my whims and fancies, too.

Discussion of adaptation choices cut for people who are more behind than I am and who also consider adaptation choices to be a form of spoiler )

After the movie was over, my mom, who is a strictly movie verse-only fan, asked me why Bilbo had been brought along in the first place. I said that as far as I knew the movie came closer to answering this than the book, that answer being that apparently hobbits are like teddy bears for Gandalf and he feels better when he's carrying one around with him. This actually is almost working for me; but then, I still massively ship Gandalf/Pippin.
mayhap: Russell Brand plants a kiss on Noel Fielding (Goth Detectives)
I'm regretting now that I didn't find a cave or something four years ago when I saw Iron Man and devote myself to consuming vast quantities of Avengers-related comics (which would, of course, later be recapitulated in a five-minute training montage). I just want to write all the porn and find myself hampered by a lack of paracanonical knowledge to draw world-building detail from. I mean, seriously, how are you going to set a sex scene on a planetoid if you're not sure how its gravitational pull would affect visiting humans?

Speaking of source canon knowledge, we probably would have seen The Avengers again yesterday if it hadn't been for the release of the latest messy and rather self-indulgent Tim Burton/Johnny Depp/Helena Bonham Carter collaboration, Dark Shadows. You see, a while back This American Life reran their Conventions episode, and we learned that my mother had been a youthful aficionado of Barnabas Collins and his gothic doings. In fact, she said, when her family went on vacation in 1967, her friend Carla made copious notes for her so that she would be apprised of everything that had taken place in Collinwood. My brother and I both being huge genre dorks, naturally we thought this was amazing, and when we heard about the movie with Johnny Depp, whom my mother will watch in literally anything although she denies that this constitutes a crush, we knew we were going to be taking her to see it.

Even better, before we actually left for the movie, my mom combed through all of her keepsake boxes and actually found a letter from Carla with her recap! I have transcribed it for posterity and your reading pleasure below. )

The movie itself was not bad, although it relies pretty lazily on fish-out-of-water humor and Johnny Depp's funny reaction faces to everything. To be fair, Johnny Depp does have some very funny reaction faces.
mayhap: five hands together (Together.)
I will freely admit that the only reason that I got into the whole Avengers thing is my profound and abiding love of the Iron Man movies and Tony Stark. There were things I enjoyed about the Captain America and Thor movies, yes, but they were still basically homework that I had to get through so I could watch the new Iron Man movie (and, like homework, I totally put it off and didn't finish watching Thor until the last possible minute, in the car on Friday afternoon). I flatly refused to have anything to do with any Hulk movies; I asked my brother if he thought there was anything I needed to know from them, and he gave me this pop quiz:
Him: What does the Hulk do?
Me: Smash?
Him: You're good.

I mention this only to underscore the fact that, post-movie, they are basically all my favorites. Especially the Hulk. Did not see that one coming in a gigantic pair of trousers.

I was fortunate enough to get to watch it with the aforementioned brother, late Friday night under the influence of large doses of caffeine, all circumstances which enhanced my enjoyment greatly but also militated against sharing said enjoyment in any coherent manner. Here, therefore, are some belated and not particularly coherent thoughts. )
mayhap: Pete and Patrick are furries (furries)
Things that are awesome today:

1. The movie version of Fantastic Mr. Fox, which I saw with my father this afternoon. He was deeply floored by how awesome it was, because he had heard nothing about it and was just expecting a fun kids movie. I was expecting it to be pretty awesome and was still floored by how awesome it was.

I would say that the basic plot outline was Dahl and everything else about the execution was totally vintage Wes Anderson, and I mean that as an endorsement. Both because I really like Wes Anderson, and because it's a sensible method of adaptation. A movie should bring something genuinely new and worthwhile to the story, or else seriously, just read the book already.

Possibly my favorite bit: all the adults, and occasionally, the children, use 'cusswords' appropriately in the situations they find themselves in. How, then, does the film achieve its PG rating? Every instance of a verboten four-letter word has been replaced with 'cuss', so that, for example, towards the climax of the film, the characters find themselves in a situation that can only be described as a 'clustercuss'. Okay, so it's kind of twee, but I thought it was hilarious and allowed the dialogue to flow with the rhythms that actual adults (and children) use.

2. The American Indian Art Collection at the Nelson-Atkins Museum of Art. I hadn't heard that this was coming to the museum, much less that it had opened less than a month ago, so it was an extremely pleasant surprise when we came upon it during our post-movie visit.

It is huge. The range of objects, styles, origins, materials, you name it, is completely dazzling. I was especially impressed by how many of the relatively older objects were identified as the work of a particular artist whose reputation had been preserved in his or her tribe, and I thought all of the plaques did a good job placing the objects in as specific a context as possible. I loved the inclusion of many pieces by contemporary Indian artists and how they were placed right among older pieces that demonstrate the context the artist was working in, allowing the viewer as an outsider to appreciate a tiny bit of the culture that influenced the piece.

Luckily, one of my favorite pieces is online, so I can link to it: this pair of 'Rez Bans' by Kevin Pourier. I think the pun there is hilarious, the glasses are plain gorgeous (and you know I have a Thing for glasses), and the layers of meaning behind the materials and the pattern just make me squee more. The fact that they were tucked in among an exhibit of other Lakota pieces made me feel like I was sharing in this completely awesome inside joke.

I was seriously impressed by the whole exhibit. I suspect that the fact that a lot of the collection was accessioned quite recently might explain how extensive the histories on many of them were and how effectively they were presented, because somebody cared about these things and made sure that they came out. Whoever worked on this did good.
mayhap: Pete and Patrick are furries (furries)
Things that are awesome today:

1. The movie version of Fantastic Mr. Fox, which I saw with my father this afternoon. He was deeply floored by how awesome it was, because he had heard nothing about it and was just expecting a fun kids movie. I was expecting it to be pretty awesome and was still floored by how awesome it was.

I would say that the basic plot outline was Dahl and everything else about the execution was totally vintage Wes Anderson, and I mean that as an endorsement. Both because I really like Wes Anderson, and because it's a sensible method of adaptation. A movie should bring something genuinely new and worthwhile to the story, or else seriously, just read the book already.

Possibly my favorite bit: all the adults, and occasionally, the children, use 'cusswords' appropriately in the situations they find themselves in. How, then, does the film achieve its PG rating? Every instance of a verboten four-letter word has been replaced with 'cuss', so that, for example, towards the climax of the film, the characters find themselves in a situation that can only be described as a 'clustercuss'. Okay, so it's kind of twee, but I thought it was hilarious and allowed the dialogue to flow with the rhythms that actual adults (and children) use.

2. The American Indian Art Collection at the Nelson-Atkins Museum of Art. I hadn't heard that this was coming to the museum, much less that it had opened less than a month ago, so it was an extremely pleasant surprise when we came upon it during our post-movie visit.

It is huge. The range of objects, styles, origins, materials, you name it, is completely dazzling. I was especially impressed by how many of the relatively older objects were identified as the work of a particular artist whose reputation had been preserved in his or her tribe, and I thought all of the plaques did a good job placing the objects in as specific a context as possible. I loved the inclusion of many pieces by contemporary Indian artists and how they were placed right among older pieces that demonstrate the context the artist was working in, allowing the viewer as an outsider to appreciate a tiny bit of the culture that influenced the piece.

Luckily, one of my favorite pieces is online, so I can link to it: this pair of 'Rez Bans' by Kevin Pourier. I think the pun there is hilarious, the glasses are plain gorgeous (and you know I have a Thing for glasses), and the layers of meaning behind the materials and the pattern just make me squee more. The fact that they were tucked in among an exhibit of other Lakota pieces made me feel like I was sharing in this completely awesome inside joke.

I was seriously impressed by the whole exhibit. I suspect that the fact that a lot of the collection was accessioned quite recently might explain how extensive the histories on many of them were and how effectively they were presented, because somebody cared about these things and made sure that they came out. Whoever worked on this did good.

I ♥ MULCH

Feb. 7th, 2009 09:25 pm
mayhap: ink sketch with text chibi!Neil Gaiman (chibi!Neil)
Just got back from seeing Coraline with Stan and his sister and father. Our audience was a nice mix of pleasing and engaged children with their parents and slightly older children like ourselves, which rounded out a magical viewing experience.

Reluctantly, I returned my stylish 3-D glasses on account of the environment and also, too much miscellany already. Everyone else kept theirs.

[livejournal.com profile] wisdomeagle, I'm ripping audiobooks to listen to at work, and did you know that P.S. Longer Letter Later is read by the authors??? :D

I ♥ MULCH

Feb. 7th, 2009 09:25 pm
mayhap: ink sketch with text chibi!Neil Gaiman (chibi!Neil)
Just got back from seeing Coraline with Stan and his sister and father. Our audience was a nice mix of pleasing and engaged children with their parents and slightly older children like ourselves, which rounded out a magical viewing experience.

Reluctantly, I returned my stylish 3-D glasses on account of the environment and also, too much miscellany already. Everyone else kept theirs.

[livejournal.com profile] wisdomeagle, I'm ripping audiobooks to listen to at work, and did you know that P.S. Longer Letter Later is read by the authors??? :D

Cinepuri!

Oct. 5th, 2006 03:06 pm
mayhap: Inui's glasses shining (shiny glasses)
Finally got my hands on the raw Prince of Tennis live action movie yesterday! I watched it last night with Stan, who has consumed no Prince of Tennis in any format save a handful of episodes from the Hyotei arc. I tried to translate and/or explain stuff; Stan provided vodka. I leave it as an exercise for the reader to determine which proved more illuminating.

Cut for mild spoilers / bored people who don't care )

To summarize, the Prince of Tennis movie is a valuable tool for converting people who like pretty boys to the Tenipuri cause.

Cinepuri!

Oct. 5th, 2006 03:06 pm
mayhap: Inui's glasses shining (shiny glasses)
Finally got my hands on the raw Prince of Tennis live action movie yesterday! I watched it last night with Stan, who has consumed no Prince of Tennis in any format save a handful of episodes from the Hyotei arc. I tried to translate and/or explain stuff; Stan provided vodka. I leave it as an exercise for the reader to determine which proved more illuminating.

Cut for mild spoilers / bored people who don't care )

To summarize, the Prince of Tennis movie is a valuable tool for converting people who like pretty boys to the Tenipuri cause.
mayhap: Hobbes the tiger has an idea (idea!)
I went in to have my hair cut and now my eyebrows are gone.

Actually, they're swoopy and sort of pretty and definitely what I'm supposed to want my eyebrows to look like, I think, but I liked them before. They were pretty! In a kind of manly sort of way! Oh well.

This week's daddy-daughter film experience was Superman Returns, although we ended up seeing it yesterday as opposed to over the actual weekend because during the actual weekend we were doing ... something. I think. I forget.

I thought it was extremely adequate and very, very, very pretty. During the slower moments I distracted myself with lovely crossover crack on the basis of the fact that Brandon Routh's Clark Kent looks strikingly similar to Shirota Yuu's Tezuka what with the way he parts his hair and the glasses and all and you know, it would explain a lot of things! Or maybe I just have a one-track mind.
mayhap: Hobbes the tiger has an idea (idea!)
I went in to have my hair cut and now my eyebrows are gone.

Actually, they're swoopy and sort of pretty and definitely what I'm supposed to want my eyebrows to look like, I think, but I liked them before. They were pretty! In a kind of manly sort of way! Oh well.

This week's daddy-daughter film experience was Superman Returns, although we ended up seeing it yesterday as opposed to over the actual weekend because during the actual weekend we were doing ... something. I think. I forget.

I thought it was extremely adequate and very, very, very pretty. During the slower moments I distracted myself with lovely crossover crack on the basis of the fact that Brandon Routh's Clark Kent looks strikingly similar to Shirota Yuu's Tezuka what with the way he parts his hair and the glasses and all and you know, it would explain a lot of things! Or maybe I just have a one-track mind.

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